Cracks cost vase owners £685k: Rare Chinese ornament could be worth £700k

Cracks cost vase owners £685k: Rare Chinese ornament should be worth £700k… but has slumped in value because of its poor condition

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A couple found out that the old Chinese vase languishing under a table at their home could be worth £700,000.

But they were then told it might only fetch £15,000 because it is so badly cracked.

An expert discovered the rare blue and white lantern vase during a house visit in Leicestershire to assess a range of antiques. 

It dates from the rule of Emperor Qianlong between 1735 and 1799. 

The rare blue and white lantern vase could be worth £700,000

 Charles Hanson, the auctioneer who examined the vase, said that in mint condition it would have fetched between £600,000 and £700,000 at auction. 

But because it has numerous cracks and glued repairs, the 18in high pot is more likely to fetch between £15,000 to £25,000.  

The vase was accidentally broken when it was knocked over during a hunting party in the 1950s. 

It will be sold at Hansons’ Fine Art Auction in Etwall, Derbyshire, next Monday.  

Mr Hanson said: ‘It dates back to the period of Emperor Qianlong, circa 1735-99, which makes it a rarity and potentially extremely sought after. It was languishing under a table in a living room.

‘I spotted it during a routine house visit I undertook in Leicestershire to assess a range of antiques.

The vase was accidentally broken when it was knocked over during a hunting party in the 1950s

The vase was accidentally broken when it was knocked over during a hunting party in the 1950s 

 ‘In good condition its auction estimate would have been in the region of £600,000 to £700,000.’

Featuring contrasting shades of cobalt blue, the vase is decorated with a herd of deer, including a red stag and blue doe, amid a mountainous landscape with pine trees and rocks.

The neck of the vase has parallel bands depicting cranes and clouds, Lingzhi prunus, fruiting peach branches and ruyi head…

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