Internet Stunned by NYC’s ‘Smallest Apartment’ Going For 0 Per Month

Internet stunned by NYC’s ‘Smallest Apartment’ going for $650 per month

A man known for sharing videos touring people’s apartments has recently shared a clip that went wildly viral showing what he said is the smallest apartment in New York City.

Caleb Simpson posted the video to his account @calebwsimpson, where it was viewed more than 30 million times as viewers got a look inside Alaina Randazzo’s $650 per month apartment located in midtown Manhattan.

“Today we tour the smallest apartment in New York City at 80 square ft., which is the size of a parking spot,” read the caption on Simpson’s YouTube video, which is an extended version of the tour.

Zumper reported that the average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in New York City was $3,975—a 28 percent increase over the span of a year.

This average price for rent varies in different neighborhoods throughout the city. While an apartment in one neighborhood may call for $1,800 per month, another apartment in a different neighborhood will ask for $4,198 per month.

Simpson’s TikTok video gave viewers a brief look around Randazzo’s apartment.

$650 in Midtown Manhattan

The camera gives a bird’s eye view of the tiny space as the door swings open and Randazzo walks into the kitchen/living room combination space.

The door almost hits the flat-screen TV and small entertainment center, which sit about a foot away from the perpendicular two-burner stove and single sink.

The next clip showed just how small the space was––Randazzo laid on the floor with her head propped up on her front door, and her feet propped up on the minifridge under the stove and sink.

“5’5″ on a good day, and you don’t fit,” Simpson said over the clip.

A small couch sits across the room from the television, next to a ladder that led up to her loft bed.

“It’s a loft, so that’s what I like the most about the layout,” Randazzo said.

Randazzo’s apartment does not have a window, but a skylight provides natural light during the day. A bathroom was down the hall from the unit.

The extended version of the tour was posted on Simpson’s YouTube channel where Randazzo and Simpson talked about what it was like living in the small space.

She revealed that she once lived in a luxury high-rise before moving to the apartment featured in the videos.

“I was debating if I was going to move back to [Los Angeles] when this lease was over, so it was a six-month short-time lease,” Randazzo said. “I just found it and thought it would be nice and convenient.”

She explained that she had the ability to travel without paying much for rent.

“People need a lot less than what they think they need,” Randazzo said. “I learned that here.”

Simpson noted in the comments section of his YouTube video that Randazzo only planned to live in the apartment for a year and does not plan to renew the lease.

TikToker Reactions

Viewers on TikTok were blown away by the space—some saying that the space would be too small for them.

“I’m too claustrophobic for this,” a viewer wrote.

“I just can’t do a shared bathroom, I’m sorry,” wrote another.

Others, however, enjoyed seeing the space.

“This looks so appealing to me,” one viewer commented. “No kids. No husband. So easy to keep clean.”

“That’s actually a cool setup for $650,” a comment read.

Newsweek reached out to Caleb Simpson and Alaina Randazzo for further comment.

Tiny houses and small-footprint living has become increasingly popular.

Another New Yorker claims he has the “smallest apartment in New York City,” which he showed off on TikTok in December.

One woman shared a video giving a tour of her Paris apartment which measures 96 square feet.

While some think living in such a tight space isn’t appealing, others are clearly enjoying it, and one woman offered some tips on how people living in small spaces can best make it their own.

The post Internet Stunned by NYC’s ‘Smallest Apartment’ Going For $650 Per Month appeared first on Newsweek.

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